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Zechariah 9:9 & meaning...

Rejoice 

greatly, daughter of Zion! Shout, daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your King comes to you! He is righteous, and having salvation; lowly, and riding on a donkey, even on a colt, the foal of a donkey.

Zechariah 9:9

Context

I will encamp around my house against the army,

    that no one pass through or return;

    and no oppressor will pass through them any more:

    for now I have seen with my eyes.

Rejoice greatly, daughter of Zion!

    Shout, daughter of Jerusalem!

Behold, your King comes to you!

    He is righteous, and having salvation;

    lowly, and riding on a donkey,

    even on a colt, the foal of a donkey.

Zechariah 9 [10.] I will cut off the chariot from Ephraim,

    and the horse from Jerusalem;

and the battle bow will be cut off;

    and he will speak peace to the nations:

    and his dominion will be from sea to sea,

    and from the River to the ends of the earth.

As for you also,

    because of the blood of your covenant,

    I have set free your prisoners from the pit in which is no water.


Meaning:

  • Rejoice Greatly, Daughter of Zion:

The verse begins with a call to joy and celebration for the people of Zion, representing the city of Jerusalem and the nation of Israel as a whole. This exhortation sets the tone for the significant announcement that follows.

  • Your King Comes to You:

The proclamation shifts the focus to the arrival of the long-awaited King, who is coming to establish His reign over His people. This King is none other than the promised Messiah, fulfilling centuries of prophetic anticipation.

  • He is Righteous and Having Salvation:

The description of the King emphasizes His righteousness and His role as the source of salvation for His people. This highlights both His moral purity and His redemptive purpose, underscoring the dual nature of His kingship as both just and savior.

  • Lowly, Riding on a Donkey:

In a surprising twist, the verse depicts the Messiah's mode of transportation as humble and unassuming. Rather than arriving in regal splendor on a majestic steed, He comes riding on a donkey, symbolizing humility and peace rather than conquest and war.


Significance:

Fulfillment of Messianic Prophecy: Zechariah 9:9 stands as a remarkable fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy regarding the Messiah. This verse was cited by the Gospel writers as being fulfilled in Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:4-5; John 12:14-15), confirming His identity as the promised King and Savior.

Rejoicing in the Messiah's Arrival: The call to rejoice underscores the significance of the Messiah's coming for the people of Israel and, by extension, for all believers. His arrival heralds the fulfillment of God's promises and the establishment of His kingdom, bringing hope, joy, and salvation to all who receive Him.

The Paradox of Kingship and Humility: The image of the Messiah riding on a donkey encapsulates the paradox of His kingship—a reign characterized by humility, servanthood, and sacrificial love. This contrasts sharply with earthly notions of power and authority, highlighting the upside-down nature of God's kingdom.


Cross References:

Matthew 21:4-5: Matthew's Gospel records the fulfillment of Zechariah's prophecy in Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, demonstrating how Jesus deliberately fulfilled the Old Testament Scriptures to reveal His identity as the Messiah.

John 12:14-15: John's Gospel also references Zechariah 9:9 in the context of Jesus' triumphal entry, emphasizing the disciples' recognition of Jesus as the long-awaited King of Israel.


In Conclusion: Zechariah 9:9 serves as a poignant reminder of the Messiah's identity and mission, inviting us to rejoice in His coming and to embrace the paradox of His kingship—a reign marked by humility, righteousness, and salvation. As we reflect on this verse, may we echo the joyous proclamation of the people of Jerusalem and welcome Jesus as our King and Savior, who comes to bring peace and redemption to all who believe in Him.


PIB Scriptures are derived from the World English Bible