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Titus 1:5-8 meaning...

This presents guidelines for appointing elders in the church. These verses outline the qualities and characteristics that should be present in those who serve as leaders within the community of believers. The apostle Paul is addressing Titus, who is tasked with the responsibility of appointing elders in the churches of Crete. The qualities outlined here reflect the character and conduct expected of those who will lead and shepherd God's people.

Verse 5 emphasizes the purpose of Titus' mission: "I left you in Crete for this reason, that you would set in order the things that were lacking and appoint elders in every city, as I directed you." Paul's primary concern is to establish order and leadership within the churches. The appointment of qualified elders is crucial for the spiritual health and growth of the congregation.

Applying this aspect of the verses to our lives, we recognize the importance of leadership within the church community. Just as Titus was entrusted with the task of appointing leaders, we are called to identify and support those who exhibit the qualities of godly leadership. The role of elders is not about prestige but about service and accountability.

The theme of leadership and order is also emphasized in 1 Peter 5:2-3, which says, "Be shepherds of God’s flock that is under your care, watching over them—not because you must, but because you are willing, as God wants you to be; not pursuing dishonest gain, but eager to serve; not lording it over those entrusted to you, but being examples to the flock."


Verses 6-8 outline the specific qualities that should characterize elders:

  • "Blameless, the husband of one wife": 
Elders should be individuals of unquestionable character, faithful in their marital commitments, and examples of moral integrity.
  • "Having children who believe, who are not accused of loose or unruly behavior": 
Elders' families should also reflect their leadership and faithfulness, with well-behaved and believing children.
  • "Not self-pleasing, not easily angered, not given to wine, not violent, not greedy for dishonest gain": 
Elders should display self-control, humility, and an aversion to vices that could hinder their ability to lead effectively.
  • "Given to hospitality, as a lover of good, sober-minded, fair, holy, self-controlled": 
Elders should be characterized by positive virtues such as hospitality, discernment, fairness, holiness, and self-discipline.

Applying these aspects of the verses to our lives, we recognize that leadership within the church demands a high standard of character. The qualities listed here provide a framework for not only elders but also for any Christian who seeks to serve and lead others. These virtues are not only relevant within the church context but also in our daily interactions and relationships.

The theme of virtuous living is emphasized in Philippians 2:3-4, which says, "Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others."


In conclusion, Titus 1:5-8 offers a blueprint for appointing elders within the church. These verses highlight the importance of leadership, the need for godly character, and the qualities that should characterize those who serve as spiritual shepherds. The guidelines provided here serve as a reminder that leadership is rooted in humility, integrity, and a heart for service. As we apply these lessons to our lives, may we seek to exemplify these virtues in our roles within the church and the broader community, remembering that leadership is ultimately about pointing others to Christ and serving them with love and authenticity.

See also: vs 7-8


Titus 1:5-8. I left you in Crete for this reason, that you would set in order the things that were lacking, and appoint elders in every city, as I directed you; if anyone is blameless, the husband of one wife, having children who believe, who are not accused of loose or unruly behavior. For the overseer must be blameless, as God’s steward; not self-pleasing, not easily angered, not given to wine, not violent, not greedy for dishonest gain; but given to hospitality, a lover of good, sober minded, fair, holy, self-controlled.