Skip to main content

Hebrews 2:9-10 meaning...

This presents a profound passage that highlights the significance of Jesus' incarnation and His redemptive work on behalf of humanity. In these verses, the author of Hebrews emphasizes the purpose and meaning of Christ's suffering and exaltation. The author of Hebrews begins by acknowledging that Jesus, in His incarnation, was "made a little lower than the angels." This refers to the fact that Jesus, as the Son of God, temporarily took on human flesh and lived among us. By becoming human, Jesus experienced the fullness of human life, including suffering and death.

Applying this verse to our lives, we are invited to consider the humility and love of Jesus in His willingness to enter into the human experience. He voluntarily chose to be born as a human, to identify with our struggles and weaknesses, and to taste death on behalf of everyone. Jesus' incarnation demonstrates His deep love for humanity and His desire to reconcile us with God.


The phrase "because of the suffering of death crowned with glory and honor" refers to Jesus' exaltation after His death and resurrection. Through His suffering and obedience to the Father's will, Jesus was crowned with glory and honor, signifying His victory over sin and death.

Applying this aspect of the verse to our lives, we are reminded of the redemptive nature of Jesus' suffering. Through His sacrificial death, Jesus paid the price for our sins and opened the way for us to be reconciled with God. In Philippians 2:8-9, Paul describes the exaltation of Jesus: "And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name."


The verse continues, "that by the grace of God he should taste of death for everyone." Jesus' death was not limited to a select few but was offered for the salvation of all humanity. His sacrifice was a demonstration of God's grace and love, providing a way for us to be forgiven and reconciled with God.

Applying this aspect of the verse to our lives, we are invited to receive the gift of salvation offered to us through Jesus' death and resurrection. The grace of God is extended to all, regardless of our background or past mistakes. In John 3:16-17, Jesus affirms this truth: "For God so loved the world, that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish, but have eternal life. For God didn’t send his Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world should be saved through him."


The second part of the passage states, "For it became him, for whom are all things, and through whom are all things, in bringing many children to glory, to make the author of their salvation perfect through sufferings." This verse emphasizes the divine purpose of Jesus' suffering and exaltation. By undergoing suffering, Jesus became the "author of their salvation," the pioneer and source of our redemption.

Applying this aspect of the verse to our lives, we are called to recognize Jesus as the perfect Savior, who accomplished our salvation through His suffering and death. The author of Hebrews describes Jesus as the "pioneer" who leads the way to glory, inviting us to follow Him in faith and obedience.


In 1 Peter 2:21, Peter encourages believers to follow in Jesus' footsteps: "For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for us, leaving you an example, that you should follow his steps." As we follow Jesus, we experience transformation and become more like Him, as the Holy Spirit works in us and conforms us to His image.

In conclusion, Hebrews 2:9-10 portrays Jesus' incarnation and exaltation, emphasizing the redemptive purpose of His suffering and death. By becoming human and tasting death on our behalf, Jesus demonstrated His love and grace, offering salvation to all who believe in Him. As the pioneer of our salvation, Jesus invites us to follow Him in faith and obedience, as we are transformed into His likeness through the work of the Holy Spirit. May we respond to Jesus' sacrifice with gratitude and faith, trusting in His finished work on the cross and eagerly following Him as the author of our salvation.

See also: vs 11-13


Hebrews 2:9-10. We see him who has been made a little lower than the angels, Jesus, because of the suffering of death crowned with glory and honor, that by the grace of God he should taste of death for everyone. For it became him, for whom are all things, and through whom are all things, in bringing many children to glory, to make the author of their salvation perfect through sufferings.