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Galatians 4:27 & meaning...

For 

it is written, “Rejoice, you barren who don’t bear. Break out and shout, you that don’t travail. For more are the children of the desolate than of her who has a husband.”

Galatians 4:27

Context

Galatians 4 [25.] For this Hagar is Mount Sinai in Arabia, and answers to the Jerusalem that exists now, for she is in bondage with her children. But the Jerusalem that is above is free, which is the mother of us all. 

Galatians 4 [27.] For it is written,

“Rejoice, you barren who don’t bear.

    Break out and shout, you that don’t travail.

    For more are the children of the desolate than of her who has a husband.”

Galatians 4 [28.] Now we, brothers, as Isaac was, are children of promise. But as then, he who was born according to the flesh persecuted him who was born according to the Spirit, so also it is now. However what does the Scripture say? “Throw out the servant and her son, for the son of the servant will not inherit with the son of the free woman.” So then, brothers, we are not children of a servant, but of the free woman.


Meaning:

In Galatians 4:27, the apostle Paul references the prophetic words from Isaiah 54:1, weaving it into his discourse to convey a profound spiritual truth. 

  • Quoting Isaiah:

"For it is written, 'Rejoice, you barren who don’t bear..."

Paul begins by citing the Old Testament scripture from Isaiah, acknowledging the authority and relevance of the prophetic message in the context of the Gospel.

  • Call to Rejoice:

"Rejoice, you barren who don’t bear. Break forth and shout, you that don’t travail..."

The verse reiterates the call to rejoice, specifically addressing those who have experienced barrenness or inability to bear children. The imagery of breaking forth and shouting signifies a joy that cannot be contained.

  • Divine Multiplication:

"For more are the children of the desolate than of her who has a husband."

The quoted passage emphasizes the divine principle of multiplication—God's ability to bring forth a greater spiritual offspring from those who might seem barren or unproductive.

  • Significance:

Spiritual Barrenness and Fruitfulness: aul extends the metaphor from physical barrenness to spiritual barrenness. The call to rejoice is not just about earthly fertility but about the spiritual productivity and fruitfulness that God brings into the lives of believers.

Joy in Redemption: The call to rejoice is deeply connected to the redemptive work of Christ. Believers, once in a state of spiritual barrenness, are called to joyfully celebrate the transformative power of salvation and the spiritual offspring produced through faith.

Inclusive Blessings: The comparison between the desolate and the one with a husband suggests that God's blessings are not limited by human circumstances. His grace and favor extend to all, and His ability to bring forth abundance is not restricted by earthly conditions.


Cross-References:

Isaiah 54:1: "Sing, barren, you who didn’t bear; break forth into singing, and cry aloud, you who did not travail with child: for more are the children of the desolate than the children of the married wife,” says Yahweh." Referencing the original passage from Isaiah emphasizes the continuity of the message in both the Old and New Testaments.

John 1:12-13: "But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God’s children, to those who believe in his name: who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God." The concept of spiritual birth and becoming children of God aligns with the theme of divine multiplication and the spiritual offspring mentioned in Galatians.


In Our Daily Lives:

Spiritual Rejoicing: Galatians 4:27 encourages believers to rejoice in their spiritual redemption. It prompts us to celebrate the new life and identity we have in Christ, transcending any past spiritual barrenness.

Hope in Transformation: The verse inspires hope in the transformative power of God. It reminds us that, through faith in Christ, we can experience a spiritual multiplication and fruitfulness that surpasses our previous state.

Embracing Inclusive Blessings: Understanding the inclusivity of God's blessings encourages believers to see beyond human limitations. It fosters a sense of unity and shared spiritual heritage among believers.


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PIB Scriptures are derived from the World English Bible